WeeksRosesMasthead
All rose-related terms used in this website can be found here.

AARS:

All American Rose Selection.

Blade:

The broad part of a leaf.

Bract:

A modified or reduced leaf that occurs beneath and next to a peduncle.

Bud Union:

The swollen part of the stem where the scion of a grafted rose meets the understock.

Calyx:

The protective cover of a rose flower, composed o the sepals.

Cane:

One of the main stems of a rose plant.

Climbers:

Roses whose long canes can be trained along fences or walls, variable in flower size, form and mature habit.

Corolla

The petals of a rose flower considered as a single unit.

Cultivar:

A named rose variety exhibiting distinct and consistent features, indicated by single quotation marks.

Floribunda:

Medium sized flowers often more compact in habit, medium length stems.

Grandiflora:

Large flowers borne in clusters usually taller in habit, individual stems within each cluster are suitable or cutting.

Hip:

The fruit of a rose Inflorescence: the flowering part of a plant; a rose inflorescence may bear single or multiple flowers.

Hybrid Tea:

Large flowers generally borne one per stem, medium to tall in habit, long cutting stems.

Leaflet:

The individual segment of a compound rose leaf.

Miniatures:

Small flowered roses with proportionately smaller foliage, often very compact in habit, stems are also shorter but still suitable for cutting.

Node:

The point on a stem from which leaves and buds emerge.

Old Rose:

Strictly speaking, a rose introduced before 1867, but more loosely used to describe any rose grown or introduced before 1900 Once-blooming: a rose that flowers only once in early summer and does not repeat.

Own-root:

A rose propagated as a cutting rather than by grafting.

Peduncle:

A stalk that supports a single flower or flower cluster Petal: the showy, usually colored part of a flower.

Petiole:

The stalk by which a leaf attaches to a stem; also leafstalk.

Pistil:

The female reproductive organ of a flower, consisting of an ovary, style, and stigma.

Polyanthas:

Small flowers borne in very large clusters, usually compact in habit, medium-short stems.

Prickle:

The technical term for a rose thorn.

Root-stock:

The root portion of a plant onto which the scion is grafted; also understock

Rugosas:

Species or near-species roses valued for their hardiness old fashioned flowers and fountainous habits. Many are available on their own roots.

Scion:

A shoot grafted onto a rootstock; the "top" of a grafted rose.

Sepal:

One of the five individual, leaflike divisions of the calyx.

Shrubs:

Free blooming plants with differing flower sizes and forms, broadly varying in mature size but of full bushy attractive habit,usually good disease resistance and hardiness.

Shrublets™:

Roses of varying habits which are never too big to tuck into restricted garden spaces.

Sport:

A spontaneous genetic mutation, often resulting in a plant that bears flowers of a different color or with more or fewer petals than the original plant.

Stamen:

The male reproductive organ of a flower, consisting of a filament and anther.

Stipule:

A small, leaflike appendage that occurs at the base of the petiole.

Sucker:

A stem, usually unwanted, that originates from a rootstock.